How Effective is the ADB in Facilitating Access to Climate Finance?

A real-time evaluation of the Asian Development Bank

In the context of climate change, real-time evaluations are used to provide timely and useful information needed to progressively assess the implementation of interventions. Unlike summative evaluations, findings from real-time evaluation help make rapid adjustments and improvements to ongoing activities and subsequently help ex-post evaluations.

The Asian Development Bank (ADB) recently conducted a real-time evaluation of its initiative to support access to climate finance.

Asia is one the regions hardest hit by the effects of climate change. For poverty to be eliminated in the region and the overarching goal of sustainable development to be achieved, mitigation and adaptation measures must be scaled up.

While the international community has made considerable progress in providing funds intended to combat the effects of climate change, access to these funds remains deeply problematic and difficult especially for stakeholders in developing countries.

A significant part of the last United Nations Climate Change conference in Warsaw, Poland last November 2013 was dedicated to discuss access to climate finance. Since then, further discussions have focused not only on sources of funding, but also on how they should be targeted and channeled. The emergence of several funding initiatives in recent years has not always translated to imemdiately and easy access to governments, private sector, civil society organizations and other major stakeholders.

In order to streamline the process and facilitate access, Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs) especially regional banks have been identified as streams through which these funds are channeled. The Asian Development Bank (ADB) is among these regional banks.

Recently, the Independent Evaluation Office (IED) of the ADB undertook an evaluation of its initiative to support access to climate finance to governments, private sector, NGOs and other stakeholders in the Asian region. So how well is the ADB doing?

Please join in the debate on real-time evaluation of climate change. What is your view on these approach to climate change interventions in general?

Read complete report

Add comment

Plain text

  • Allowed HTML tags: <p> <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Latest Blogs

What is Safe Monitoring and Evaluation Practice in the 21st Century?

Monitoring and evaluation practice can do harm. It can harm:

the environment by prioritizing economic gain over species that have no voice
people who are invisible to us when we are in a position of power
by asking for...

The GEF and Cleantech: Evaluating Efforts to Build an Innovation Ecosystem

Global factors such as technological advances, lowered costs, available capital, consumer demand and climate change have been encouraging the development and deployment of clean technologies as part of low...

Recent FAO evaluation highlights the role of GEF in programmes addressing integrated natural resource management for sustainable food and agriculture systems

In November 2018, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has released an evaluation of its contributions to integrated natural resource management for sustainable agriculture.

CIF Evaluation & Learning: What Are We Learning About the Big Issues in Climate Finance?

The scale and urgency of the climate crisis demands rapid action to prevent a range of consequences – from increased droughts and floods to huge economic losses and more extreme natural disasters.  

All major climate funds and...

Rethinking resilience, adaptation and transformation in a time of change

“How the world deals with large and serious problems is almost certainly going to shape our collective future” is the second line – and a promising start – in this edited Springer volume titled...